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Malaysian officials have confirmed that although t... more
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  • Malaysian PM Najib Razak says committed to finding Flight MH370
    KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak has assured the families of all 239 people aboard Flight MH370 that Malaysia, together with Australia and China, remains committed to locate the aircraft that mysteriously vanished over the Indian Ocean nearly 11 months ago.

    "Today my thoughts are with the families of those on MH370. The search will continue. Malaysia, Australia and China remain committed to finding the plane," Najib said in a post on his official Facebook page.
    Malaysian PM Najib Razak says committed to finding Flight MH370
    KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak has assured the families of all 239 people aboard Flight MH370 that Malaysia, together with Australia and China, remains committed to locate the aircraft that mysteriously vanish...See more
  • Jenifer posted a forum topic
    Sonia Gandhi, Rahul denied me meetings: Jayanthi Natarajan
    New Delhi: Jayanthi Natarajan quit the Congress on Friday, after a letter written by her to party president Sonia Gandhi on N...
  • 8 year old suggest a possible cure for cancer
    For most elementary school students, finding the cure for cancer probably isn't normal dinner table conversation. But for one British 8-year-old, the topic came up and led to successful lab results.
    Camilla Lisanti's parents are both cancer researchers at Manchester University. Over dinner, her father,
    Michael, asked her how she would cure the disease, and she suggested using antibiotics, "like when I have a sore throat."
    Michael and his wife, Federica Sotgia tested her theory at the lab and were surprised to find that several cheap and widely used antibiotics destroyed cancerous cells in samples from breast, prostrate, lung, overian, pancreatic, skin and brain tumors. Some of the antibiotics worked by preventing cancer cells from making energy-providing mitochondria which cancer stem cells are prolific in.
    Most importantly, these common antibiotics tested did not harm healthy cells. Michael believes they could prove to be an effective and inexpensive treatment.
    "I thought it was very naive to think you could cure cancer with antibiotics, but at the end of the day Camilla was right," he told the Daily Mail. "She usually is right about things."
    The research is promising but is limited to lab results and need to be tested on people.
    In a comment to The Independent, Dr. Alan Worsley, Cancer Research UK's senior scientist said that some antibiotics have been known to have anti-cancer effects since 1960s and are well-established part of cancer treatment, along with chemotherapies.
    "There's no indication from this work that these particular antibiotics would kill cancer cells in patients, or what sort of side effects there might be," he told The Independent.
    8 year old suggest a possible cure for cancer
    For most elementary school students, finding the cure for cancer probably isn't normal dinner table conversation. But for one British 8-year-old, the topic came up and led to successful lab results.
    Camilla Lisanti's parents are both cancer...See more
  • John Dawin created a new blog post
    MH370: Nine things we will never know about the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines plane
    Malaysian officials have confirmed that although the search for missing flight MH370 will continue, the disappearance of the aircraft has be...
  • John Dawin created a new blog post
    Astronomers find lord of the rings
    Astronomers say they have found the first-ever ringed planet beyond our solar system, a super-world with a girdle of halos 200 times bigger than Satur...
  • 2015 BusinessDay Economic Survey: Australian dollar plunges, Reserve Bank rate cut on the cards
    The Australian dollar has plunged to its lowest level since mid-2009, just days ahead of a crucial Reserve Bank board meeting, with speculation mounting that interest rates could be cut to historic lows on Tuesday.
    Economists are split over whether the RBA will bow to domestic and international pressure to cut rates below 2.5 per cent next week as Australia's currency continues a rapid depreciation in the face of stronger-than-expected US jobs figures and declining terms of trade.
    Australian holidaymakers have watched the dollar lose nearly 18 per cent in value in the past six months, its sharpest slide over that time frame since the financial crisis, and are wondering how much more value the dollar could lose as they weigh up the costs of overseas travel.
    Consumers are also counting the cost of more expensive imports, with the relative price of online goods rising as the dollar fades.
    The currency touched a multi-year low of US77.22¢ on Friday, down from US110¢ in mid-2011, forcing some currency watchers to predict this week that it could now slip to US69¢ over the year.
    A Fairfax Media survey of Australia's top economists also paints a bleak picture of the year ahead. It predicts unemployment will climb, the budget deficit will blow out, and business investment will slip backwards.
    Predictions for annual economic growth in 2015 – taken from the 25 economists working across financial markets, academia, consultancy, and industry – range from a scarily weak 0.5 per cent to a stronger 3.6 per cent, with the average sitting at an annual 2.6 per cent.
    Business investment is expected to shrink by 4.8 per cent, in news that will not be welcomed by the government, while the terms of trade are expected to fall another 3.6 per cent through the year.
    Every economist expects the dollar to be worth less than US87¢ by December 31, with most thinking it will be worth just US77¢.
    But some are warning the dollar will need to fall much further than that if it is to provide the spur to non-mining activity that the Reserve Bank and Treasury so desperately want.
    Warren Hogan, ANZ chief economist, warned the dollar will need to fall significantly lower if it is to help non-mining parts of the economy pick up as required. If it doesn't do fall that far, it will only help to "dampen" the negative effects of lower commodity prices rather than help economic activity jolt back to life, he said.
    "A lower currency will help but it is no panacea," Mr Hogan said.
    "Unless the currency noticeably overshoots its fundamentals, which is possible, it would just continue to play a shock-absorbing role," he said.
    Views on unemployment are dispiriting.
    The majority of economists surveyed believe the unemployment rate will rise from 6.1 per cent to 6.5 per cent by June, before dipping slightly to 6.4 per cent by December 31.
    Steve Keen, from Kingston University, London, and Stephen Anthony, from Macroeconomics, were the most bearish, thinking the unemployment rate will hit 7 per cent by the end of the year.
    Peter Jones, from Master Builders Australia, was the most optimistic, predicting unemployment will finish the year at 5.75 per cent.
    Expectations about the budget deficit varied wildly, with Mr Keen predicting the largest blowout – to $60 billion in 2014/15 – while AMP Capital's Shane Oliver, and Melbourne University's Neville Norman predicted a much smaller $38 billion deficit.
    The average expected deficit for the 2014 financial year is $43.8 billion.
    In a sign that many economists believe the political stalemate in Canberra will continue into next year, the average expected budget deficit for 2015/16 is $34.2 billion.
    Su-Lin Ong, from RBC Capital, warned that ongoing problems in federal politics could even dampen the positive effects of a lower dollar.
    "Business confidence has ... responded positively to a lower currency, although this appears to have been overwhelmed by the budget stalemate, fiscal slippage and increasing concern over the budget's structural position, and the lack of commitment more broadly to increased reform," Ms Ong said.
    2015 BusinessDay Economic Survey: Australian dollar plunges, Reserve Bank rate cut on the cards
    The Australian dollar has plunged to its lowest level since mid-2009, just days ahead of a crucial Reserve Bank board meeting, with speculation mounting that interest rates could be cut to historic...See more
  • Jane created a new blog post
    Guinea Wins Drawing of Lots at Africa Cup of Nations
    Guinea won the drawing of lots for a spot in the Africa Cup of Nations quarterfinals on Thursday by choosing a green ball with the No. 2 printed on a ...
  • bigvines created a new blog post
    Relatif à ou peut-être contre le cavalier?
     Tout au long de Gstaad, sur les
    collines impliquant Courchevel ou peut-être la télécabine Thollon-les-Mémises,
    la veste sera particulièremen...
  • bigvines created a new blog post
    Nike Air Max 90 Wintertime PRM Collection
     Aside from the come back involving
    'Pumpkin Spice' style has become the fascinating thing about the fall to see
    just how manufacturers just ...
  • bigvines joined our site!
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