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Most viewed model | May 2015
Most viewed model | May 2015
Federal Democratic Republic Of Ethiopia | Election for House Of People's Represe...
May 24th, 2015 | Election for house of people's representative.
Jane May 24
Republic Of Burundi | Election for National Assembly
Burundi's National Assembly Election
Jane May 26
Fifa U-20 World Cup New Zealand 2015
Fifa u-20 world cup new zealand 2015.
Adeolu May 30
Trinidad and Tobago | Election for House Of Representatives
May 31st, 2015 | Election for House of Representatives.
Jane May 31
Canada 2015 | Fifa Women's World Cup
Fifa Women's World Cup
Jenifer Jun 6
2015 UEFA Champions League Final
2015 UEFA Champions League Final
Mexico | Election for Chamber of Deputies
June 7th, 2015 | Election for Chamber of Deputies
Jane Jun 7
Catalonia | 2015 Referendum Election
Catalonia | 2015 Referendum Election.
Jenifer Sep 27
Euro 2016
Euro football championship
John_dawin Jun 10 '16
U.S Presidential Election | November 8th, 2016.
U.S Presidential election, November 8th, 2016.
John_dawin Nov 8 '16
2018 FIfa World Cup | Russia 2018
2018 Fifa World Cup | Russia 2018
Jane Jun 14 '18

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  • Jane posted a forum topic
    Police release photos of hardcore criminals who escaped from Kamiti Maximum prison
    Nairobi, Kenya - Police officers have released photos of three hardcore criminals who escaped from Kamiti Maximum prison and are requesting the p...
  • Jane uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Ethiopia readies for elections, but outcome not in doubt. Addis Ababa - Ethiopia, Africa's second-most populous country, readied on Saturday for the first general election since the death of strongman Meles Zenawi, whose successor Hailemariam Desalegn is all but certain to stay in office. Over 36.8 million Ethiopians have registered for Sunday's polls, but on Saturday life in capital Addis Ababa went on as normal. Apart from a few military vehicles at occasional crossroads, there was little sign that key elections were to be held the next day. Analysts say the election falls far short of open competition. "Electoral defeat is not on the cards for Ethiopia's ruling party, but it is vital for the country's development that it engages more effectively with dissenting voices," said Jason Mosely, from Britain's Chatham House think tank. The Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) has been in power for over two decades and is confident of a win, but insists the result will be decided on its economic record alone. Ethiopia is now one of Africa's top performing economies and a magnet for foreign investment. Rights groups - which routinely accuse Ethiopia of clamping down on opposition supporters and journalists, and of using anti-terrorism laws to silence dissent and jail critics - said on Saturday the polls would not be free or fair due to a lack of freedom of speech. Addis Ababa dismisses such criticism, with government spokesperson Redwan Hussein telling AFP that voters would choose their representatives based on performance. "If they want to give us another chance they will vote for us," he said. "If they have a grudge, they will not give their vote to EPRDF." Polls open at 08:00 (05:00 GMT) on Sunday and close at 18:30 (15:00 GMT), with initial results expected within two to five days, and final official tallies on June 22. Ethiopia, whose 1984 famine triggered a major global fundraising effort, has experienced annual economic growth of more than 10% over the last five years, according to the World Bank. Former Marxist rebel-turned-leader Meles, who died in 2012, was succeeded by Prime Minister Hailemariam, who has said he is committed to opening up the country's political system to allow more space for opposition parties. Exceptional' democracy? The opposition accuses the government of using authoritarian tactics to ensure a poll victory. "The political space has been closed," said Yilekal Getinet, leader of Semayawi - the "Blue Party" in Ethiopia's Amharic language, and one of the nation's main opposition parties. Such complaints are dismissed as "baseless" by the National Election Board of Ethiopia (NEBE). "The environment created for political parties this year is exceptional," NEBE president Merga Bekana said. The Election Commission will deploy about 40 000 observers at 45 795 polling stations. The only foreign election observers are from the African Union, which has sent a team of 59 officials. The European Union and the US-based Carter Center, which monitored 2005 and 2010 elections, were not invited back this time. Candidates from 58 parties are running for office, but each must go through a system of drawing lots organised by the NEBE to limit the number of candidates to 12 per constituency. Critics say the system is designed to hamper the main challengers. Semayawi, for example, had 456 applicants, but only 139 were allowed on final ballot lists. "While symbolically significant... the polls are more of a logistical hurdle for the ruling party than a competitive, democratic exercise," Mosely said. The ruling EPRDF won 2010 elections in a landslide. Those polls were peaceful, in contrast with 2005, when opposition accusations of irregularities sparked violence that left 200 people dead. The opposition won 172 seats in that vote, but only one in 2010. This time, that solitary incumbent opposition MP has chosen not to run again. Meanwhile, polls in the constituency of the single independent legislator seeking re-election were postponed on Friday, after he complained there had not been "enough time and space" for campaigning. Source: http://www.news24.com/Africa/News/Ethiopia-readies-for-elections-but-outcome-not-in-doubt-20150523-2Ethiopia readies for elections, but outcome not in doubt. Addis Ababa - Ethiopia, Africa's second-most populous country, readied on Saturday for the first general election since the death of strongman Meles Zenawi, whose successor Hailemariam Desalegn is all but certain to stay in office. Over 36....See more
  • Adeolu uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Nigerian senator-elect wanted for US drug deal 'arrested'. LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) — Nigerian drug agents Saturday surrounded the house of a senator-elect wanted by the United States in a nearly 20-year-old heroin deal that was the alleged basis for the TV hit "Orange is the New Black." Buruji Kashamu is under house arrest, according to the chairman of Nigeria's National Drug Law Enforcement Agency, Ahmadu Giade. But Kashamu's spokesman, Austin Oniyokor, said, "He has not been arrested but there is a siege to his house and an attempt to forcibly take him." He said the agents did not have an arrest warrant. Giade said Kashamu, 56, will appear in a federal high court Monday to start extradition proceedings to the United States. He said agents raided Kashamu's home in Lagos at around 5 a.m., before dawn Saturday. Armed agents were seen surrounding the property Saturday night. Kashamu has already been suing a Nigerian court to prevent attempts to extradite him. He had become a powerful politician and financier of President Goodluck Jonathan's party. Jonathan lost the March elections but Kashamu was elected a senator in balloting opponents said was rigged. A Chicago grand jury in 1998 indicted Kashamu for conspiracy to import and distribute heroin in the U.S. Kashamu has said it is a case of mistaken identity and that prosecutors really want the dead brother he closely resembles. He said Saturday's development was a political conspiracy, according to his spokesman. "This latest onslaught is a confirmation of the alleged plot to illegally abduct him in spite of the pending suit against this illegality," Oniyokor said. It was not clear when the United States filed an extradition request, but the Nigerian drug agency's spokesman, Ofoyeju Mitchell, said a U.S. extradition request was the reason for Saturday's action. The move comes days before Jonathan is to step down. President-elect Muhammadu Buhari takes office Friday. The U.S. had failed to ask Nigeria to extradite Kashamu before now. In September, Chicago Judge Richard Posner refused a motion to dismiss Kashamu's case and quoted the U.S. Justice Department as saying that "the prospects for extradition have recently improved." Posner also noted that "given Kashamu's prominence ... the probability of extradition may actually be low." A previous request to extradite him from Britain failed in 2003. Kashamu spent five years in a British jail before he was freed over uncertainty about his identity. He was carrying $230,000 when he was arrested there. A dozen people long ago pleaded guilty in the case including American Piper Kerman, whose memoir was adapted for the Netflix hit "Orange Is The New Black." Kerman's book never identified Kashamu by name, only citing a West African drug kingpin. Former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo has chastised Jonathan for his perceived protection of Kashamu and warned that "drug barons ... will buy candidates, parties and eventually buy power or be in power themselves." Kashamu has said that Obasanjo did not call him a drug baron when they were allies and while he spent some $20 million ensuring their party's success at 2011 elections. Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-3094305/Nigerian-senator-elect-wanted-US-drug-deal-arrested.html#ixzz3azqsiMAH Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on FacebookNigerian senator-elect wanted for US drug deal 'arrested'. LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) — Nigerian drug agents Saturday surrounded the house of a senator-elect wanted by the United States in a nearly 20-year-old heroin deal that was the alleged basis for the TV hit "Orange is the New Black." Buruj...See more
  • Adeolu uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    'Scores' of Islamists killed in Nigeria. Nigeria's military is claiming the killing of scores of Boko Haram insurgents and the rescue of 20 more hostages during an operation in the notorious Sambisa forest, an Islamist stronghold. 'Despite continuous encounter with large number of land mines which still litter the Sambisa forest, troops have forged ahead...as scores of the terrorists died in the assault on their bases on Friday,' a defence ministry statement said on Saturday. 'A total of 20 women and children were rescued at the end of the Friday operation,' in the forest in the country's northeast, it added. One soldier died while 10 others were wounded in the assault on rebel bases, according to the statement. There was no way to independently verify the military's claims. The defence ministry's accounts of clashes with Boko Haram have in the past not been consistent with eye witness reports. But Nigeria has reportedly won a series of successes over the insurgents in recent weeks. More than 700 hostages, primarily women and children, have reportedly been freed during the military's assault on Sambisa, which Boko Haram has used as a base for several years. According to Amnesty International, the extremists have kidnapped more than 2,000 women and girls since the start of last year. Nigeria's latest assault on the insurgents has been backed by troops in neighbouring Chad, Cameroon and Niger. - See more at: http://www.skynews.com.au/news/world/africa/2015/05/24/-scores--of-islamists-killed-in-nigeria.html#sthash.QgTkd06D.dpuf'Scores' of Islamists killed in Nigeria. Nigeria's military is claiming the killing of scores of Boko Haram insurgents and the rescue of 20 more hostages during an operation in the notorious Sambisa forest, an Islamist stronghold. 'Despite continuous encounter with large number of land mines which...See more
  • Adeolu posted a forum topic
    Nigerians ask Yale to withdraw Okonjo-Iweala's award
    Some Nigerians have called on Yale University in the United States to withdraw the Honorary Degree it bestowed on the Minister of Finance and Coordina...
  • Adeolu posted a forum topic
    Nigerian State debt | His Excellency may soon be on the run
    THE Nigeria Labour Congress ,NLC, the apex labour organisation for all workers, announced five months ago, that 11 state governments had not paid Dece...
  • Jenifer uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Julie Bishop and Shinzo Abe strike military deal. Australia hopes to ink a deal with Japan this year that would smooth the passage of military personnel into one another's country for joint exercises in a further tightening of strategic bonds amid concern about Chinese ambition in the region. Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop met with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Saturday and discussed security and regional issues including the reciprocal arrangement for military personnel. "There will be easier access for Australian defence personnel into Japan and Japanese defence personnel into Australia, specifically for the purposes of joint exercises," Ms Bishop told Fairfax Media after her meeting with the Japanese leader. Australia and Japan have been drawing closer together under the Abbott government, which also has a clear enthusiasm for buying Japanese submarines to replace the ageing Collins Class fleet. The reciprocal deal on entry of military personnel for exercises, which the government hopes to sign by the end of the year, will further strengthen the relationship. Currently for Australian Defence Force troops to go to Japan, they must do so under obsolete arrangements set up during the Korean War in the 1950s. Concerns over China's ambition in the region have been heightened recently over its land reclamation efforts in the South China Sea, which have included building airstrips that can accommodate large military planes. Further north, Japan is also at loggerheads with China over a set of disputed islands in the East China Sea, seen as a major potential flashpoint for hostilities in the region. Ms Bishop and Mr Abe met in the city of Iwaki in Fukushima prefecture during a conference of Pacific leaders that Japan holds every two years. That followed her visit to Seoul for talks with South Korea, Mexico, Indonesia and Turkey. Mr Abe has made moves to relax Japan's extremely tight restrictions on how it can use its military, a change that means reinterpreting the country's constitution. He has also signed recently an update to Japan's defence guidelines with the United States that would allow Japan to defend its friends, say by shooting down a missile fired from North Korea at the United States, which it could not currently do. Ms Bishop said Australia strongly supported this change. But the Japanese leader has faced stiff resistance and discomfort at home over his stance given the strongly pacifist strain that remains in Japanese society. Ms Bishop said it was "nice to get him to confirm ... that they'd like [the joint exercises agreement] to progress." Ms Bishop also clarified some reports that said Indonesia claimed most asylum seekers on boats stranded in seas off south-east Asia were not persecuted Rohingyas from Myanmar but economic migrants from Bangladesh. The Indonesians were "extrapolating" from three boats that had landed in Aceh province and Malaysia, each carrying between 600 and 700 people. These had carried on average 30 percent Rohingyas and 70 percent Bangladeshis. There are another 7000 stranded at sea whose ethnicities are unknown. "I think what [the Indonesians] are trying to say is this is not as straightforward as people think it is, it's much more complex. "That's Indonesia's most educated guess. I'm in no position to judge. "It is about the Rohingyas as well as the Bangladeshis. The point they are making is that you cannot say that is a boat of 600 Rohingyas because it's not. It's 200 Rohingyas and 400 Bangladeshis. The Bangladeshis are not fleeing persecution from Bangladesh."Julie Bishop and Shinzo Abe strike military deal. Australia hopes to ink a deal with Japan this year that would smooth the passage of military personnel into one another's country for joint exercises in a further tightening of strategic bonds amid concern about Chinese ambition in the region. Forei...See more
  • Adeolu uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Can ISIS buy nuclear weapons from Pakistan? Islamic State claims it could buy its first nuclear weapon from Pakistan within 12 months. Isis has used its propaganda magazine Dabiq to suggest the group is expanding so rapidly it could buy its first nuclear weapon within a year. The article, which the group attributes to British hostage John Cantlie, claims Isis has evolved into "the most explosive Islamic movement the modern world has ever seen" in less than 12 months. Photojournalist Cantlie, who has been held hostage for more than two years, is regularly used in the terrorists' propaganda and has appeared in a number of videos. The latest article describes militant Islamist groups such as Boko Haram, which recently pledged allegiance to Isis, uniting across the Middle East, Africa and Asia to create one global movement. "The Islamic State has billions of dollars in the bank, so they call on their wilayah [authority and governance] in Pakistan to purchase a nuclear device through weapons dealers with links to corrupt officials in the region," the article states. It admits such a scenario is "far-fetched" but warns: "It's the sum of all fears for Western intelligence agencies and it's infinitely more possible today than it was just one year ago. And if not a nuke, what about a few thousand tons of ammonium nitrate explosive? That's easy enough to make." The capacity of Isis to acquire such a device is certainly beyond the group at the moment but it has secured a number of oilfields in Syria and Iraq. The finances of the group have been estimated by some to be in the US$2 billion area. The threats come against a mixed backdrop of successes and losses in both countries. The group has been driven out of Tikrit in Iraq but has overrun Ramaldi and the Syrian ancient city of Palmyra.Can ISIS buy nuclear weapons from Pakistan? Islamic State claims it could buy its first nuclear weapon from Pakistan within 12 months. Isis has used its propaganda magazine Dabiq to suggest the group is expanding so rapidly it could buy its first nuclear weapon within a year. The article, which th...See more
  • UK resident to face Victorian court on historical rape charges.
    A British-Australian dual citizen will face court today in Melbourne after being arrested and charged over historical sexual assault allegations.

    The 63-year-old has been charged with 58 counts of aggravated rape and associated offences.

    He was living in the United Kingdom, where he was surrendered to Australian authorities by local police on May 22 in response to an extradition request.

    He'll face the Melbourne Magistrates Court today.
    UK resident to face Victorian court on historical rape charges.
    A British-Australian dual citizen will face court today in Melbourne after being arrested and charged over historical sexual assault allegations.

    The 63-year-old has been charged with 58 counts of aggravated rape a...See more
  • Kevin Systrom is the man behind the fastest growing social media platform.
    THERE wasn’t a spare hand in the front row of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week last month.
    Not because of the Champagne flutes or rounds of applause, but the mobile phones, poised to take the perfect Instagram shot. Editors and bloggers were positioning, clicking and filtering their hearts out. The #ellery hashtag was used 21,592 times, Tourism Australia’s (@Australia) pic of the Ten Pieces show inside a drained Bondi Icebergs pool was liked by 45,700 people, and Ludwig was the most used filter. #flattering
    Talking from his Menlo Park HQ in California, the co-founder and CEO of Instagram, Kevin Systrom, 31, reveals he’s no stranger to f-row Instagramming himself. At the Burberry show in LA in April, Systrom was seated across from Anna Wintour and David Beckham. Coincidence? We think not. He confesses, “I was trying to get the best Instagram. I was sitting next to Ryan Seacrest and we were competing to see who could take the better photo. I think I won, but his got more likes.”
    So how did a Stanford graduate from Massachusetts end up sitting on the front row at Burberry, staring at Becks? He blames Karlie Kloss. Systrom met the supermodel three years ago when she started dating one of his friends, just before she became a Victoria’s Secret Angel and way before Instagram was big in the fashion world. He didn’t know who she was. Now he teases her about being an early adopter: “You’re the reason, Karlie. You’re the reason that we’re so big.”
    While Kloss definitely didn’t hurt the cause, the success of Instagram comes down to Systrom and fellow co-founder Mike Krieger’s simple idea. “We wanted to build something that took advantage of the fact that everyone was carrying around a computer in their pocket,” Systrom explains.
    First known as Burbn (a nod to Systrom’s favourite spirit), the check-in app allowed users to share their location and attach photos. It didn’t take long for the duo to figure out that the photo-sharing aspect of the app was the most popular. They stripped it back and focused on the photos, offering 11 different filters to sun-kiss #bikinibodies and sharpen #sunset snaps. The rest, as they say, is softly hued history.
    When Instagram launched in October 2010, it had 25,000 downloads in the first day. Two hours after it went live, the app crashed under the pressure of the traffic. In that moment Systrom thought it was all over: “We weren’t ready for it to be popular.” But that’s precisely what it was. It became the number one app in the App Store within 24 hours.
    “It was trial by fire,” he likes to say, or perhaps trial by water? “We were thrown into the pool and it was a sink-or-swim moment.” And swim they did. Instagram now boasts 300 million users. Not bad for a start-up that began operating out of Twitter’s old office in the South Park neighbourhood of San Francisco with $500,000 funding from venture capitalist firms Baseline Ventures and Andreessen Horowitz.
    Since its $1 billion sale (in cash and shares) to Facebook in 2012, the team grew from 12 to more than 200. According to the Pew Research Internet Project, Instagram is the fastest growing social-media site, beating Facebook and Twitter. Users spend 21 minutes a day on it and upload more than 70 million photos daily.
    So why are we so obsessed? Why can’t we go to the gym, walk along a beach or eat avocado on toast without sharing a photo? Systrom sees Instagram as fulfilling a basic instinct: “I think we are all visual beings. Vision is our strongest sense, and at the end of the day, we all want to communicate visually.” That explains it.
    So, too, does the dream of being discovered. Instagram is a platform that allows for that, whether you’re a photographer, model, pastry chef or skateboarder. It’s an open playing field, but it doesn’t hurt to be Gigi Hadid, or at least look like her. Marc Jacobs has held campaign castings using the hashtag #castmemarc on Instagram. Similarly, IMG Models admitted to Systrom that one of the first things they do when they’re casting for a shoot or a show is look at how many followers a model has on Instagram.
    “Instagram has become this place where you can be discovered organically,” says Systrom. “It’s a meritocracy. It’s about the content you produce, how authentic it is, how engaging it is, and because of that, it means you can really put your own personal brand forward.”
    The ability to “find your visual voice” on Instagram is something the CEO talks about often. In a world where everyone is a content producer and photojournalist, Instagram has a levelling effect. Professional photographers and mummy bloggers alike are expressing themselves on Instagram, both working with the same quality cameras and filters.
    But with success comes pressure. “My life has changed in the sense that it’s got busier and more serious,” says Systrom, who’s been in a relationship with fellow Stanford alumnus Nicole Schuetz, 31, since their university days. “I have the responsibility of running a community of 300 million people.” He describes a deep sense of duty to make sure everything goes well; policy-wise, growth-wise and technology-wise.
    For someone so concerned with the policy of his company, Systrom doesn’t have much to say about its user guidelines. When asked about the recent decision to allow images of breastfeeding mothers on Instagram, he replies, “I’m not actually super-close with the specifics of the guidelines.” On banning the eggplant emoji search (which looks similar to a large, purple… member): “It’s a tough place to be, but you can talk more to the team about it for specifics.” On the rise of celebrities Photoshopping their Instagram posts: “I’m not familiar with it.” But he does follow Kim Kardashian West (I checked).
    One account he is keen to talk about is his current favourite, @symmetrybreakfast. Look it up. It’s a feed run by a British couple who prepare and delicately plate up their breakfast as mirror images, snapping them in their symmetrical glory. Think croissants, waffles and Tuscan beans. As well as making him hungry, @symmetrybreakfast represents all that Instagram is to Systrom. “It just shows how you can take the everyday and make it beautiful.” Kind of like Kim K’s work-out selfies, no? OK, moving on…
    The future of Instagram is as bright as its Lo-Fi filter (read: very). It’s recently launched @music, an account dedicated to capturing and sharing the world’s musical moments. Also, Hyperlapse – an app for creating polished time-lapse videos. And there’s Layout, an app that lets you combine multiple photos into a single image. On the next big thing, Systrom is guarded. “I would tell you, but then I would take all the magic out of our next launch.” And we wouldn’t want that.
    On reflection, “I’d be lying if I said I expected it to get this big, but I’m super-happy to see it,” he says. “We’re thankful this stroke has happened and, really, now it’s just about continuing the stroke. At the same time that 300 million is large, it’s actually the tip of the iceberg.”


    Source:http://www.news.com.au/...e_editors_picks=true
    Kevin Systrom is the man behind the fastest growing social media platform.
    THERE wasn’t a spare hand in the front row of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week last month.
    Not because of the Champagne flutes or rounds of applause, but the mobile phones, poised to take the perfect Instagram shot. E...See more
  • John_dawin uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Australia an estranged country to many Muslims including Sheik Omran. Sheik Mohammed Omran remembers clearly the day he was meant to become an Australian citizen. He had bought himself a pair of shiny new shoes and a new suit. He had told the handful of friends he’d made during his three months here to come and celebrate with him. He turned up on the day of the ceremony, a Jordanian in a wide, welcoming land, only to realise he had made a terrible mistake. He was a week late. The woman behind the desk soon put him at ease. No worries, luv. All he needed to do was sign a note saying he still wanted his Australian citizenship and they would mail him the certificate. When it came to applying for a passport, he realised there wasn’t anyone in Australia who’d known him for the requisite six months to vouch for him. Again, no worries. The local post office manager was happy to bear witness for a stranger in need and scrawl his name on the dotted line. “This is how life was,” Omran says. “Beautiful and easy. Everything was nice and helpful. It meant so much to me.” The year was 1983. Bob Hawke had just been given the keys to the Lodge. Australia would soon win the America’s Cup. In the Middle East, war was raging between Iraq and Iran and within Lebanon, but in his adopted home of Wollongong, Abu Ayman — as his friends know the sheik — was a young man at peace. “That life I really appreciated Australia for. I came to see it and live it and wanted it for my children and grandchildren.” Australia’s most senior Salafist cleric says if he knew then what he does now, he wouldn’t have come at all. On a Saturday night in Coolaroo, an industrial northern Melbourne suburb where more people consider themselves Muslim than any other religion, the sheik speaks with disappointment, a tinge of bitterness and overwhelmingly a deep sense of dismay. He says he feels like a foreigner in his own country. “If I knew that one day this would happen in Australia, I swear by the almighty God I will never step foot in my — in your — country,” he tells Inquirer from his office inside the Hume Islamic Youth Centre, where young families are starting to drift in for pizza and prayers. Omran gestures to his adult son Osama, who is quietly serving tea to the older men in the room. “He feels he is not wanted because his name is Islamic. Everyone gets devastated by that.” Across Muslim Australia, the sheik’s dismay is widely shared. Against a backdrop of tightening anti-terror and citizenship laws, the creeping threat of online radicalisation and corrosive influence of Islamophobia, Muslim communities are confronting a crisis of cohesion, community and leadership. In the south Brisbane suburb of Holland Park, where a mosque has stood since the early years of Federation, Ali Kadri recounts stories of women being too fearful to go to shopping centres wearing their hijabs, of second and third-generation Muslims being abused for growing their beards, of neighbourhood streets that no longer feel safe. It has been this way only in the past two years, he says. He invites non-Muslim Australians to step into the shoes of a friend of his, a chemical engineer who works for a large company in central Brisbane. Recently at work, he took a crowded lift to his floor. When he got off, someone behind him remarked they could all feel safe now. The man’s ears burned as the lift doors closed to sniggering laughter. “When he came and talked to me about the incident he said it doesn’t matter if his life is in danger, he would rather live in Pakistan than Australia now,” Kadri says. To that experience, the unmarried Kadri adds a personal insight: “I wouldn’t want to bring a Muslim girl into this country any more. I would marry someone here. I don’t want to bring her into an unsafe environment.” Even community leaders who fully support the federal government’s $1.2 billion crackdown on terrorism and acknowledge the unique threat posed by Islamic State recruiters say Muslim Australia has never felt this uncomfortable. “It is very hard to be an Australian Muslim these days,” says Jamal Rifi, a GP who has become a prominent voice within the Australia’s largest and most concentrated Muslim community in Lakemba and the surrounding suburbs of western Sydney. “It has always been hard but it is even harder now. The community is unfortunately in the situation where it is being attacked from the outside, attacked from overseas and eaten up from the inside. We are at the crossroads. The soul of this community is actually being lost, to be honest.” Rifi believes Australia’s peak Muslim body, the Australian Federa­tion of Islamic Councils, is not capable of providing the leadership its communities need. He will get no argument from the AFIC’s founding president Haset Sali, who this week described the “tragic power vacuum” at the heart of the organisation. What leadership Muslim Australia has is fragmented and ineffective. “These are ordinary citizens trying to cope with extraordinary pressure and they are probably ill-equipped to do it,” Rifi says. “Muslim Australia, or what they call AFIC, they are almost nonexistent in this debate. They control the most funding, they control Islamic schools, yet they are not playing an active role.” Muslim Australia is itself a misnomer. Its communities are varied, disparate and in some cases fiercely at odds over what the problems are and how to address them. To appreciate the fault lines, look no further than the conflicting responses offered to the touchstone issue of radicalisation. Omran, emir of the Ahlus Sunnah wal Jama’ah school of Islamic thought characterised by literal ­interpretations of the Koran, believes the global threat represented by Islamic State is exaggerated and the national security risk posed by Muslim Australians seeking to join its ranks is grossly overblown. “There are so many issues to be more worried about than terrorists,” he says. “How many Australians have been killed by terrorists? Skin cancer, breast cancer kill thousands every year.” Mustafa Abu Yusuf, an adviser to the sheik and a spokesman for the ASWJ, goes further. He describes terrorism as a fabricated issue that cynically has been used by successive governments to create a Muslim bogeyman. “There is an old Arab proverb,” Yusuf says. “ ‘When you believe that someone is good all you hear from them is good. When you believe someone is bad all you can see is bad.’ You marginalise and demonise elements of the community, then you push them beyond the limits, where they don’t feel like they belong. If it wasn’t for the half-decent people in Australia most of the Muslim community would be pushed out on to the fringes.” In raw numbers, the core problem of youth radicalisation is dwarfed by the scale of the federal government’s policy response. Intelligence agencies believe there are 104 Australians fighting for Islamist groups in Syria or Iraq. Between 20 and 30 people have been killed or in combat or murdered by their Islamic State comrades. About 100 Australians have had their passports cancelled on the grounds they were planning to travel to take up arms in the conflict zone. Kadri says the appeal of Islamic State (also known as ISIS) among young Muslims here is already waning. “I believe that most of the young boys who were going to go have either gone or had their passports cancelled. For the first time since this ISIS phenomenon, the young boys are disillusioned by ISIS. They see ISIS as something that has deviated the whole focus of the Syrian revolution and the (Assad) regime’s atrocities to a terrorist group, to the disservice of the Syrian people. ISIS has caused a bigger problem than it has solved.” Rifi believes the biggest threat facing Muslims in Australia is the risk of young people being drawn to Islamic State and other proscribed groups. A generation ago, the path to radicalisation was slow and involved. Joining a group such as al-Qa’ida involved time, training and winning trust within a complex organisational hierarchy. Recruitment to Islamic State’s murderous cause can take place within weeks in the confines of a teenager’s bedroom. Those who cannot travel to Syria are encouraged to kill in Australia. Given this, Rifi sees anti-terror laws that restrict travel to Syria and Iraq and entail passport confiscation and intrusive surveillance by counter-terrorism police and intelligence agencies as necessary evils. “The priority is to protect the kids’ safety right now because it is being preyed upon by devil recruiters,” he says. “They are taking advantage of the vulnerability of our young people to lead them to their deaths. The safety and security of Australia should be as important to us as to anyone else. We shouldn’t allow anyone in our community to pose a risk to the safety and security of Australia. “At the same time, I need to tell the government that they can’t win it on their own. They need the help of the community.” This help will not be forthcoming if Muslim communities do not trust government. Proposals to mesh anti-terror laws with citizenship and welfare policies, the passage of metadata laws that erode the privacy of electronic communications, a revived push to reduce protections against racially offensive speech — for Muslims these cannot be isolated from dog-whistle debates about burkas and halal food certification. The risk is further social and political disclocation within Muslim communities. On the fringes of Australian politics, European-style Islamophobia is finding voice. In October this year, the Australian Liberty Alliance, a spin-off of the “Islam-critical” Q Society, will be launched by Dutch parliamentarian Geert Wilders. In its ­published manifesto, the ALA pledges to “stop the Islamisation of Australia”. This week’s proposal by the Abbott government to strip dual-citizen jihadis of Australian citizenship faintly echoes one of Wilders’s most contentious policies: stripping Dutch citizenship from Muslims who commit crimes. With the ALA preparing to field candidates in next year’s federal election, life is will not get any easier for Australian Muslims. In this climate, the Australian media is viewed with deep scepticism by young Muslims. This in turn perpetuates cultural stereotypes and mutual misunderstanding. The usual charges against the government and media are hypocrisy and selective outrage. A rap video performed by Hussam Ahman, an Iraqi-born actor and activist living in Tampa Bay, Florida, has gained international prominence on social media. Ahman’s Expressions of an Angry Muslim captures the frustrations of young, politically engaged Muslims living in the West about the prominence given to Islamic State atrocities compared with the greater crimes of the Assad regime: “So you say ISIS is a crisis … You want to flip out when ISIS carries out crimes in the name of God but what about the drones and the bombs that we drop a lot on vil­lages? We receive images of children in little bits and pieces in the name of freedom and peace. It’s mind-boggling how we condemn in others what we condone in ­ourselves.” The rhymes could have been written by the two young Muslim men who speak to Inquirer inside the cafe of the Hume Youth Islamic Centre in Coolaroo. The cafe is in a sprawling light-industrial and retail complex that includes an Islamic department store and prayer halls. On a Saturday night, the cafe is filled with families sharing a meal after prayers. Children have the run of the cafe floor. Most women wear the hijab, with one or two preferring the more conservative niqab so confronting to non-Muslim eyes. Outside on the footpath, young men share cigarettes and banter. When two police vans turn up with lights flashing, it causes barely a pause in the conversation. The HYIC, which is closely monitored by counter-terrorism agents, is well used to a visible police ­presence. On a rainy midweek afternoon, the cafe is largely empty. Its manager, who declines to give his name, is at first annoyed at the presence of a reporter and gestures towards the door. But after a little encouragement, the young man and his friend agree to talk over a cup of coffee. They remain wary. Normally, journalists visit the centre only in the aftermath of an anti-terror raid, looking for evidence of radical thought. The young men are frustrated that since the emergence of Islamic State, they see almost nothing in the local papers about the other side of the Syrian conflict: the indiscriminate killing of Sunni civilians by the Assad regime. The manager insists that I watch videos he has stored on his phone showing the bloody aftermath of barrel bombs dropped on to residential streets, of children maimed and murdered, of victims of chemical attacks. He shares his experience of working on a building site where he was ostracised by his non-Muslim workmates. “We do feel like second-class citizens,” his friend says. “But we’re OK with that,” he facetiously adds. Muslims have endured difficult times in Australia before. Ali Dirani is a prominent figure behind a campaign to build a mosque in Coolaroo. Council approval for the mosque was grudgingly given after Dirani and others took their case to the Victorian Administrative Appeals Tribunal. Dirani previously owned a charcoal chicken franchise in Albury, a large regional town in NSW. After the Cronulla riots, customers stopped coming into his shop. Despite having established the business over several years, he was forced to close. With a heavy heart, he drove his large family down the Hume Highway to Melbourne. He now runs a successful business in Coolaroo. Dirani remains optimistic. He describes Islamic State as an illness rather than an ideology. He says the cure cannot be forced, whether through punitive laws or other measures. Rather, young Muslims need to be convinced of the opportunities Australia offers, that Muslims can prosper and freely pray here, that Islamic State is anathema to Islamic values rather than an extreme expression of them. “No sane individual would believe that the creator of humanity is going to condone this,” Dirani says. “People today, they want to make God a partner in their crimes. The individuals that are on the ground killing, the way they are doing it they have lost their humanity. My advice for the youth: try to live a purpose in life and try to have a vision and think positively. Disassociate yourself from anyone who would try to bring out the worst in you or sees negatives in everything around them. It is contagious.” Sheik Omran does not like the word extremism. He prefers deviation. The image this conjures is not of brothers who have taken things too far but misguided souls who have lost their way entirely. Through his involvement at the Brunswick mosque and more recently the HYIC, Omran has known some of Australia’s most notorious deviants: Abdul Nacer Benbrika before he formed a terrorist cell; Harun Mehicevic before he established the hardline al- Furqan Centre in Melbourne’s southast; Melbourne teenager Numan Haider before he lunged at two counter-terrorism taskforce officers with a knife outside a suburban police station. The sheik has been accused of his own deviations, most notably in describing Osama bin Laden as a good man. Omran does not apologise for his past comments or previous associations. Nor does he consider himself a firebrand, as he is often described. Rather, he sees himself as a man grown old in a country that no longer as welcoming as it once was. This disillusionment, this otherness, is at the heart of the Muslim malaise. “If they all feel this is their country, that they have the same rights, the same duties, then if a terrorist came, even if Osama bin Laden came to Australia and encouraged these children, they would tell him to get lost, that we are not going to ruin the country for you. But when everyone pushes everyone, labels everyone, everyone attacks everyone, then these people want to do it. “We have to go to the root of the problem. As Australians, we are very good at treating the symptoms but not looking for the cause. Look for the cause and all this will be solved.” source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/in-depth/community-under-siege/australia-an-estranged-country-to-many-muslims-including-sheik-omran/story-fnubfp6c-1227365820475Australia an estranged country to many Muslims including Sheik Omran. Sheik Mohammed Omran remembers clearly the day he was meant to become an Australian citizen. He had bought himself a pair of shiny new shoes and a new suit. He had told the handful of friends he’d made during his three months here...See more
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    Ireland Voters Approve Gay Marriage. DUBLIN — Ireland has become the first nation to approve same-sex marriage by a popular vote, sweeping aside the opposition of the Roman Catholic Church in a resounding victory Saturday for the gay rights movement and placing the country at the vanguard of social change. With ballots from 34 out of the 43 voting areas counted, the vote was almost two to one in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage. All but one of the districts that were counted voted yes, and it appeared to be statistically impossible for opposition votes to overcome the ayes. Turnout was large — more than 60 percent of the 3.2 million people eligible to vote cast ballots. Government officials, advocates and even those who had argued against the measure said that the outcome was a resounding endorsement of the constitutional amendment. Not long ago, the vote would have been unthinkable. Ireland decriminalized homosexuality only in 1993, the church dominates the education system and abortion remains illegal except when a mother’s life is at risk. But the influence of the church has waned amid scandals in recent years, while attitudes, particularly among the young, have shifted. The vote is also the latest chapter in a sharpening global cultural clash. Same-sex marriage is surging in the West, legal in 19 nations before the Irish vote and 37 American states, but almost always because of legislative or legal action. At the same time, gay rights are under renewed attack in Russia, in parts of Africa and from Islamic extremists, most notably the Islamic State. The results in Ireland, announced on Saturday, showed wide and deep support for a measure that had dominated public discourse and dinner-table conversation, particularly in the months before the lead-up to the vote on Friday. Supporters celebrated in gatherings and on the streets, with the rainbow colors of the gay rights movement and Yes vote buttons conspicuously on display. Surprising many who had predicted a generational divide, the support cut across age and gender, geography and income, early results showed. With early vote counts suggesting a comfortable victory, crowds began to fill a courtyard of Dublin Castle, a government complex that was once the epicenter of British rule. By late morning, the leader of the opposition, David Quinn, director of the Iona Institute, conceded the outcome on Twitter: “Congratulations to the Yes side. Well done.” For older activists, the moment marked a profound evolution of their country. For the world, it suggested how far the gay rights movement has come, to make such a significant step in a country with a storied history as a religious stronghold. “Throughout my youth, adolescence and young adulthood, it was a criminal offense to be gay,” said David Norris, a 70-year-old Irish senator and longtime activist. He said he had faced “total isolation” as a young man. “There was silence on the subject,” he said. “It wasn’t mentioned in the newspapers, it wasn’t mentioned in the broadcast media. Then there was a fear of criminal prosecution, of being involuntarily placed in a lunatic asylum, losing your job, being socially destroyed. It was a terrible situation.” Source:http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/24/world/europe/ireland-gay-marriage-referendum.html?_r=0Ireland Voters Approve Gay Marriage. DUBLIN — Ireland has become the first nation to approve same-sex marriage by a popular vote, sweeping aside the opposition of the Roman Catholic Church in a resounding victory Saturday for the gay rights movement and placing the country at the vanguard of social ...See more
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    What does memorial day mean to you? Memorial day means differently to different people, hence celebrated differently. To some its a day of remembrance and peace, to others its a day of appreciate of life and freedom. To me its a day to not only appreciate the lives sacrificed for mine but to also reckon that peace is the ultimate. And to ask the forgotten question why do we fight wars? We fight wars because nations rise against nations, because men enslave other men, because of lace of equality, because of jealousy and most potent because of limited resources in one nation but abundant in another.What does memorial day mean to you? Memorial day means differently to different people, hence celebrated differently. To some its a day of remembrance and peace, to others its a day of appreciate of life and freedom. To me its a day to not only appreciate the lives sacrificed for mine but to also re...See more
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    Facebook threatened by the rise and idea behind facekobo
    Facekobo was created to challenge big social sites who regularly turnoff user's privacy settings and sell users emails. When facekobo was created the ...
    JBrian
    Facebook is on a wrong path. I foresee facebook coming with a big offer for facekobo and hope faceko...
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    Gambian migrants undeterred by horrors of Med crossings. Despite warnings from shipwreck survivors and the international community, Gambians are refusing to abandon dreams of a new life in Europe even if it means risking their lives to cross the Mediterranean aboard rickety boats. In the capital Banjul, they talk of nightmare desert road trips, of mistreatment by traffickers and of relatives drowning, and yet the only thing stopping many from making the journey themselves is a lack of cash. Last December Lamin Fatty from the Nema neighbourhood on the outskirts of Banjul returned home from Libya where he, like thousands more, had hoped to secure a place on a boat bound for Europe. He came back due to a lack of funds and amid increasing attacks on foreigners in Libya, but vows to return to Tripoli and make another attempt. "One day, one of our colleagues left home for work, leaving us behind. He returned home with injuries on his hand claiming that he was stabbed by two young men who took his money and mobile phone," he told AFP. "As the attacks on foreigners continued, we decided to return to the Gambia as we did not have enough money to pay smugglers to smuggle us to Italy." Fatty insisted that while life was tough in Libya, he would return as soon as he had saved enough money. "There is no future for us in the Gambia," he said. Every Gambian who has failed to reach southern Europe has their own horror story, many never getting as far as securing a place on a boat. Banjul resident Adama Sarr was in a convoy smuggling fellow Gambians across the Sahara desert when the truck in front drove over a landmine. - 'Many people have died' - Tired and thirsty after days of travelling, they had been following the vehicle, crammed with Nigerians, on the desert road from Agadez in central Niger, escorted by soldiers who had been bribed to let them pass. Suddenly there was a ear-splitting bang, thick black smoke and charred body parts littering the road ahead. "The injured were taken to Agadez for treatment by the Niger military and we buried the dead in the desert and proceeded with our journey," Sarr told AFP. The group had spent more than $1,000 each just to get to Libya and the horror of the explosion galvanised their resolve rather than making them turn back. "We had to bribe the gendarmes and police on every checkpoint from Mali to Libya," said Sarr, who eventually made his way back to Banjul after failing to raise the cash for the sea crossing. Faburama Ceesay, of Bundung in Greater Banjul, told AFP he sold his home to give his son Lamin the cash to head for Europe in October 2013. "He died a month later after their boat capsized at sea. I still regret giving my son money to venture into that trip." A 12-year-old Gambian girl who survived a shipwreck in April which is thought to have killed 400 migrants -- including members of her family -- wrote an open letter after her rescue begging fellow Africans not to attempt the crossing. "Many people have died, my best friends and my sisters and my brothers have died in the wave to come to Italy," she wrote in the letter, made public at her request by the humanitarian group Pope John XXIII Community. - Cruelty and abuse - Up to 800 migrants were killed in another shipwreck on April 19 when their trawler sank between Libya and southern Italy, sparking global outrage and demands for a solution to the crisis. Meanwhile a report by Amnesty International published earlier this month said migrants in Libya faced cruelty and abuse. The situation has worsened since the NATO-backed 2011 uprising that toppled dictator Moamer Kadhafi, with powerful militias battling for Libya's oil wealth and two governments vying for power. Feeding on the chaos, people smugglers have stepped up their lucrative trade. The flow of migrants also rises when sea conditions improve in warmer months. While many Gambians who risk the trip across the Mediterranean are economic migrants, others say they are fleeing repression at home. President Yahya Jammeh, an outspoken military officer and former wrestler, has ruled the former British colony with an iron fist since seizing power in 1994. The regime is frequently berated for human rights abuses, enforced disappearances, extra-judicial killings, torture and the muzzling of journalists. Jammeh has dismissed the economic worries of Gambian migrants, arguing in a televised address last week that "true Muslims" would encourage their sons and daughters to take up job opportunities which are available at home. In reality 60 percent of the population live in poverty, and a third survive on $1.25 or less a day, according to the UN's 2014 Human Development Report. Ironically, Jammeh has taken a much softer line on non-African migrants, offering to take in all Rohingya boat people stranded in southeast Asia.Gambian migrants undeterred by horrors of Med crossings. Despite warnings from shipwreck survivors and the international community, Gambians are refusing to abandon dreams of a new life in Europe even if it means risking their lives to cross the Mediterranean aboard rickety boats. In the capital Ba...See more
  • NIGERIAN OIL WORKERS DOWN TOOLS OVER SALE OF OML 42.
    OML 42 sale causes Nigerian oil workers to shut down official business and activities at the headquarters of the corporation.

    These employees are demanding the reversal of the transfer to the Nigerian Petroleum Development Company (NPDC). They are against the operatorship of OML 42 by Shoreline Group and Neconde Energy Ltd.

    Emmanuel Ojugbana, the spokesman for white-collar oil union Pengassan, told Reuters on Tuesday, "the shut down has not been done yet," but that they would take action if the government had not met with them by the end of the week.

    According to CEO of Shoreline Group, Kola Karim, “There was never any sale of OML, the true position is very simple… NPDC, as the operating arm of NNPC, had some assets novated to them to take on the operations about three years ago."
    “Benchmarking that to what is happening today, those assets have not been operated efficiently nor does NPDC have the required funding to make sure these assets are performing."

    Karim argues that the unions were aware that assets which belong 100 per cent to NPDC, were not being adequately looked after therefore, why was the focus of their strike against assets divested to Shoreline.

    He said that a company like Shoreline had the required technical ability and financial capacity to produce royalties and revenues for the government even in the face of dropping oil prices. However, it is “shocking” that unions do not want that.

    According to reports, the Trade Union Congress of Nigeria has been pleading with the government to stop the continued scarcity of petroleum products.

    TUC further advised the government to take concrete steps on the issue of local refining to put a stop to the problem of importation of petroleum products and payment of subsidy.

    With the current decline in the oil price and Nigeria’s debt woes, Karim said that the government stands to gain more from this.

    “Government needs to step in and see the reality,” emphasised Karim.

    He cited an example of SEPLAT Petroleum Development Company.

    “When picked up, the asset production was less than 15 000 barrels a day. With SEPLAT's technical positioning and financial capacity this asset is creating over 70 000 barrels a day.”

    There seems to be a mismatch in the opportunities at hand and Nigeria being able to exploit the assets in building its cash reserves.

    Shoreline has been closed down for days now and according to Karim the government has no choice because, “The domestic gas obligation is not being met which in turn tells you the power situation is going to get worse in parts of Nigeria”.
    NIGERIAN OIL WORKERS DOWN TOOLS OVER SALE OF OML 42.
    OML 42 sale causes Nigerian oil workers to shut down official business and activities at the headquarters of the corporation.

    These employees are demanding the reversal of the transfer to the Nigerian Petroleum Development Co...See more
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    Siasia calls up 30 players for Olympics qualifier
    Coach of Nigeria’s U-23 National Team, Samson Siasia, has invited 30 players for camping, ahead of the qualifying match for the African U-23 Champions...
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    IMPROVE YOUR SEX LIFE WITH TWO-THREE CUPS OF COFFEE DAILY A startling medical study shows that two to three cups of coffee can improve your sex life. A team of researchers from the University Of Texas Health Science Center performed an extensive survey on caffeine. The study was aimed to determine the impact of caffeine products on men. More than 4,000 men were included in the study. They were requested to fill a questionnaire related to their daily consumption of caffeine and sex life. Astonishingly, research reveals that men who consume around 85 milligrams of caffeine per day are less likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction. ED is one of the biggest nightmares of men. There are numerous factors that increase the chances of ED such as tobacco use, obesity, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, hypertension and alcohol. .85 milligrams of caffeine is equal to two to three cups of coffee daily. Two cups of coffee reduces risk of impotence up to 42 percent, whereas three cups 39 percent. Dr. David Samadi, head of urology at Lenox Hill hospital, explains the affect of coffee. He informs that coffee relaxes cavernous tissues in men. It enables more blood to flow to the particular area. However, further research is needed to determine affect of caffeine on overweight and diabetes patients. Tea, coffee, cold drink and sodas are the best sources of caffeine. Source: http://apexbeats.com/recent/2209-05/improve-sex-life-two-three-cups-coffee-daily/IMPROVE YOUR SEX LIFE WITH TWO-THREE CUPS OF COFFEE DAILY A startling medical study shows that two to three cups of coffee can improve your sex life. A team of researchers from the University Of Texas Health Science Center performed an extensive survey on caffeine. The study was aimed to determine t...See more
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    Nembe Youths Disrupt OML 29 Production In Bayelsa Youths from Nembe Communities in Bayelsa have shutdown two flow stations within OML 29 to protest the divestment of Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) from the field. A resident, Michael Dennis, told News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) on Friday that the communities were aggrieved over the sale of the asset by Shell without recourse to the community. Dennis said the youths embark on the protest following several attempts to get the oil firms involved in the deal to factor in the interest of the host communities. He said youths stormed the oil field in more than 20 speedboats and shut it down without any resistance by the armed security men deployed to the facility. The resident said that the youths had forced oil workers operating the facility to safely shutdown the facility to avert any accident or damage to the installation. It will be recalled that Shell in March 2015 sold off its equity stake in OML for 1.7 billion dollars to Aiteo Eastern Exploration and Production. The security operatives claimed they were not aware of the incident, but ASP Asinim Butwat, told NAN that an official in the oil firm confirmed the development to him. “Checks at Nembe Division showed that the matter was not yet reported to the Divisional Police Officer, but a source in the facility confirmed the incident and said that it is being sorted out,” Butswat said. Nembe communities in Bayelsa and Shell held divergent views on outstanding oil spill compensation and environmental damages as the oil firm plans to divest its assets in the area. Nembe Oil and Gas Committee had in March 2013 urged prospective investors interested in acquiring Shell’s interests in oil fields in the area to investigate outstanding liabilities. The community stated that Shell had an outstanding liability of about one billion dollars in damages and compensation in the oil firm’s operations for the past 50 years in Nembe. Chief Nengi James, Chairman of the Nembe Oil and Gas Committee, however, assured that the community would extend its peaceful disposition to the new investors. Source: http://leadership.ng/news/435562/nembe-youths-disrupt-oml-29-production-in-bayelsa-2Nembe Youths Disrupt OML 29 Production In Bayelsa Youths from Nembe Communities in Bayelsa have shutdown two flow stations within OML 29 to protest the divestment of Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) from the field. A resident, Michael Dennis, told News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) on Friday t...See more
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    ''Women need to be respected'' Omotola Jalade-Ekeinde has a huge project at hand and that's to make the leaders, men and the society realize the importance of a woman and her ability to make big changes in our generation. The Nollywood superstar has lend her voice on the recently lunched 'Strong Girl' One Campaign to help empower the women through socio-economic strategies such as education, agriculture and health to help fight poverty. Speaking with Pulse TV at the lunch of the 'Poverty Is Sexist' campaign by One.org in Lagos, May 21, Omotola said, ''Women need to be respected... If you respect a woman and see her for who and what she is – as a great contributor to life and the economy - you will be able to empower them and allow them to be.'' She added the, '' allowing her to be and seeing the potential in her, you'll be the best for doing it.'' The actress further called on everyone, her fans and family inclusive, to sign the petition which will be presented to various world leaders; to emphasis on the need for women to be empowered for the better good of the world Source: http://pulse.ng/celebrities/omotola-jalade-ekeinde-women-need-to-be-respected-id3787607.html''Women need to be respected'' Omotola Jalade-Ekeinde has a huge project at hand and that's to make the leaders, men and the society realize the importance of a woman and her ability to make big changes in our generation. The Nollywood superstar has lend her voice on the recently lunched 'Strong Gir...See more
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