facekobo

Join facekobo the network everyone is talking about! The new way to find, connect, share and earn.

Upcoming events

Most viewed model | April 2015
Most viewed model | April 2015
Togolese Republic | Presidential Election
Togolese Republic | Presidential Election
Jenifer Apr 25
Anguilla | Election For House Of Assembly
Anguilla | Election For House Of Assembly
Jane Apr 25
keeper by kicking cheap fifa 15 coins the ball up over your own head into the ba...
He should have a very easy and unmissable open net. If this happens when playing with a buddy and ...
fifa0502 Apr 25
Kazakhstan | Election for President
Kazakhstan | Election for President
Youth Football Trials In Osun State, Nigeria
Join us at the school of Health Ilesa, Osun State, Nigeria from the 27th to 30th of April 2015 for t...
Adeolu Apr 27
United Republic Of Tanzania | Referendum
United Republic Of Tanzania | Referendum Election
Jane Apr 30
Boxing Match | Floyd Mayweather, Jr. vs. Manny Pacquiao
Floyd Mayweather vs Manny Pacquiao billed as "fight of the Century" is an up coming boxing at the MG...
United Kingdom | House of Commons
United Kingdom | House of Commons
Jane May 7
Republic Of Poland | President Election
Republic Of Poland | President Election
Jane May 10

MYFEED

  • AK
    Dr. Damages Show Episode 179: Top Ten Myths About Buhari On Social Media
    As Nigeria’s political season ends, America’s political season begins. Hilary Clinton is running for president. But to get to the White House, she nee...
  • Adeolu uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    EU chiefs seek UN clearance for raids against people-smugglers. After the summit concluded in Brussels, at least 14 migrants from Afghanistan and Somalia were killed after being hit by a train as they walked along the tracks at night in central Macedonia. They were making their way north when hit about 10.30pm on Thursday (6.30am yesterday AEST) by an express passenger train travelling from Thessaloniki to Belgrade. At the crisis talks in Brussels, EU leaders decided to triple from €3 million ($4.2m) a month to €9m the funding of the bloc’s search and rescue operation, as details continued to emerge of last Sunday’s shipwreck in which 800 people drowned in the Mediterranean’s worst migrant disaster. Operation Triton will continue to go no further than 50km from European shores — far away from countries such as Libya, from where many migrants depart. European Council president Donald Tusk said EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini had been tasked to “propose action in order to capture and destroy the smugglers’ vessels before they can be used”. Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi added that leaders from France and Britain — permanent members of the UN Security Council — had “committed to get a resolution from the UN for an ­intervention in Libya”. Leaders failed to agree on concrete action over the sensitive issue of what to do with migrants once they land on European shores. Draft proposals leaked before the summit had suggested that member states provide resettlement to 5000 migrants, but no number was given in the concluding statement. “I had hoped we could have been more ambitious but that was not possible,” EU Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker said. As he arrived at the summit, Prime Minister David Cameron offered to deploy Britain’s flagship HMS Bulwark, three helicopters and two patrol ships to the Mediterranean, but stressed any ­migrant rescued would not have “immediate recourse to claim ­asylum in the UK”. Other countries also offered up ships to enhance the effectiveness of Operation Triton. French President Francois Hollande said any decision to destroy the traffickers’ ships would have to be in line with international law. “It can only be done through a resolution of the Security Council,” he said. Experts have questioned the feasibility of a military response to the crisis. “It’s not an easy task to go shoot down boats in Libyan ports,” a ­European source said. He pointed out that the Islamic State was in control of parts of chaos-ridden Libya. “They will be delighted to see European soldiers come to them, they are potentially easy targets.” Survivor accounts continued to trickle of Sunday’s shipwreck near Libya. They said the smugglers operated a reign of terror before taking the migrants by truck to the coast to be ferried by dinghy to the waiting boat. A boy who climbed on to a dinghy before being told to was killed by the smugglers and his body tossed overboard. The skipper, Mohammed Ali Malek, 27, was one of the 28 survivors and faces charges of illegal confinement, culpable homicide, causing a shipwreck and aiding ­illegal immigration.EU chiefs seek UN clearance for raids against people-smugglers. After the summit concluded in Brussels, at least 14 migrants from Afghanistan and Somalia were killed after being hit by a train as they walked along the tracks at night in central Macedonia. They were making their way north when hit a...See more
  • Adeolu posted a forum topic
    Police say 14 migrants killed by train in central Macedonia
    Fourteen suspected migrants from Afghanistan and Somalia, walking in the dark along train tracks toward the European Union, were killed by a nighttime...
  • Adeolu uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Oil jumps 3%, hits 2015 high Oil prices jumped 3 percent on Thursday to their highest levels of this year amid heightened concerns about the security of Middle East oil supplies. Oil buyers also stoked the rally with bets that US crude output will shrink further after two straight weeks of declines, traders and analysts said. Gene McGillian, senior analyst at Tradition Energy, an oil markets advisory in Stamford, Connecticut, said: “You also have the assumption that US production will continue to decline from cutbacks in oil rigs count and exploration expenditure, though I’m not too much of a believer in such improving fundamentals.” The Bab El-Mandeb Strait on Yemen’s southern coast controls access to the Red Sea, Suez Canal and the ports of western Saudi Arabia. US oil production notched its third weekly decline in four weeks, the US Energy Information Administration said. US crude oil’s front-month futures contract, June, was up $2 at $58.16 a barrel by 11:55 a.m. EDT (1555 GMT). Its session high of $58.27 was a 2015 high. June UK North Sea Brent, the global benchmark for oil, jumped $2.34 to $65.07 a barrel. Its session high was a 2015 peak of $65.13. Oil prices have risen as much as $10 this month due to worries about Middle East supplies and signs of stronger global demand, particularly for automotive fuels. But so far, world supplies of crude are still in a glut. Latest estimates put production by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries at almost 2 million barrels per day above demand for its oil in the first half. US government data on Wednesday showed domestic crude stockpiles rose by 5.3 million barrels last week, well above a forecast 2.9 million barrels, to a record 489 million barrels. It was the 15th straight weekly build for US crude stocks and pushed US commercial inventories almost 100 million barrels above their year-ago level. Executives at an industry conference in Houston this week said the cost of drilling wells in the US had fallen much faster than expected, allowing producers to work oilfields that just months ago looked uncompetitive.Oil jumps 3%, hits 2015 high Oil prices jumped 3 percent on Thursday to their highest levels of this year amid heightened concerns about the security of Middle East oil supplies. Oil buyers also stoked the rally with bets that US crude output will shrink further after two straight weeks of declines,...See more
  • Adeolu uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Top Egypt businessman Sawiris testifies at Al-Jazeera retrial Nialé KABA, minister to the prime minister in charge of economy and finance of the Republic of Côte d’Ivoire, Khaled Al-Aboodi, CEO of the Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD), private sector arm of the Islamic Development Bank Group (IDB), signed an agreement to setup a sukuk program in an aggregate principal amount of CFA 300.0 billion. This program will be implemented during 2015-2020 for financing developmental projects and will be executed in two equal phases of CFA 150.0 billion. ICD, as the lead manager, would structure the Sukuk Proram, appoint and coordinate with other consultants, liaise with Government officials and oversee the entire process of the Sukuk offering. ICD is mandated to support the economic development of its member countries through provision of finance and advisory services to private sector enterprises and governments in accordance with the principles of Shari’a. Khaled Al Aboodi, CEO of the ICD, commented: “The ICD is keen to work closely with Côte d’Ivoire Government for the success of this transaction. Our ultimate goal is to develop the Shariah compliant capital market in Côte d’Ivoire to enable narrowing the financing gap for developmental projects." Nialé KABA said: “The sukuk program is in line with the objective of the Republic of Côte d’Ivoire which consist on identifying alternative financing means for developmental project that could help the country achieve an emerging economy status by 2020." The Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD) is a multilateral organization, part of the Islamic Development Bank (IDB) Group. ICD was established in November 1999 to promote economic development of its member countries in accordance with the principles of the Sharia through private sector development. ICD encourages the establishment, expansion and modernization of private enterprises through financing private sector enterprises or projects. Projects are selected on the basis of their contribution to economic development considering factors such as creation of employment opportunities and contribution to exports. ICD also provides advice to governments and private sector groups on policies to encourage the establishment, expansion and modernization of private enterprises, development of capital markets, best management practices and enhance the role of market economy. ICD operations complement the activities of the IDB.Top Egypt businessman Sawiris testifies at Al-Jazeera retrial Nialé KABA, minister to the prime minister in charge of economy and finance of the Republic of Côte d’Ivoire, Khaled Al-Aboodi, CEO of the Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD), private sector arm of the Isla...See more
  • Adeolu uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Erdogan raps EU for leaving migrants ‘to their deaths’ ANKARA: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday accused EU states of leaving migrants “to their deaths” after a succession of deadly disasters that have cost hundreds of lives. His comments came as European governments, under mounting pressure to act decisively on the growing Mediterranean migrant crisis, were to hold an emergency summit on the issue Thursday. “If these people seek refuge in European countries after somehow fleeing their home countries then how can an approach of letting the boats sink and leaving them to their deaths be adopted,” Erdogan said in televised comments. “I condemn the West’s approach. There cannot be such an approach,” he said at a news conference alongside Iraqi President Fuad Masum. He said that Turkey was hosting almost two million refugees from the Syria crisis “because it considers this a humanitarian responsibility.” Turkey has repeatedly accused the EU and the West of not doing its fair share to help Syrians and other migrants, leaving Ankara with a multibillion dollar financial burden on the issue. EU governments have already agreed to double the resources available to a maritime border patrol mission, but that has been attacked as too little, too late by refugee and rights groups. The crisis has come to a head after 800 people are feared to have died in appalling circumstances off the coast of Libya on Sunday.Erdogan raps EU for leaving migrants ‘to their deaths’ ANKARA: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday accused EU states of leaving migrants “to their deaths” after a succession of deadly disasters that have cost hundreds of lives. His comments came as European governments, under mountin...See more
  • Kuwait strips activist of citizenship
    KUWAIT CITY: Kuwait has deported a prominent activist after withdrawing his Kuwaiti citizenship last year, local media reported, a move he and other opposition figures said was politically motivated.
    The Kuwaiti government last year ordered a crackdown on people suspected of trying to “undermine the stability” of the country. The move followed the arrest of opposition politician Musallam Al-Barrak.
    The Arabic-language Al-Rai newspaper reported on Wednesday that Saad Al-Ajmi, spokesman for the Popular Action Movement (PAM) and a former correspondent for Al Arabiya news channel, was detained on Tuesday and deported.
    A Kuwaiti security source said Ajmi was sent to Saudi Arabia after his documents showed he was a native Saudi national.
    Barrak called for a meeting to discuss Ajmi’s deportation, local news website alaa.cc said.
    Born in Kuwait, Ajmi, was one of 18 people to have their citizenship withdrawn by authorities last year.
    Kuwait strips activist of citizenship
    KUWAIT CITY: Kuwait has deported a prominent activist after withdrawing his Kuwaiti citizenship last year, local media reported, a move he and other opposition figures said was politically motivated.
    The Kuwaiti government last year ordered a crack...See more
  • Jane uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Petrobras graft costs hit $2.1bn RIO DE JANEIRO: Petrobras lost $2.1 billion to the largest corruption scheme in Brazilian history, the state oil giant said, releasing its first audited accounts of a scandal that has enveloped the company and badly wounded the government. Petrobras, the largest company in the world’s seventh-biggest economy, announced losses of 21.6 billion reals ($7.2 billion) for 2014. By finally releasing its long-delayed results, the company is seeking to turn the page on five tumultuous months in which its chief executive and entire board were forced to resign and ratings agencies hit it with a string of downgrades. Prosecutors accuse Petrobras executives of colluding with construction companies to massively inflate contracts and bribe politicians, including members of President Dilma Rousseff’s Workers’ Party (PT) and its allies. Rousseff, who is facing calls to resign and popularity ratings of 13 percent just months into her second term, chaired the Petrobras board during much of the period under investigation, but is not accused of wrongdoing. The annual results, which were audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), included losses to the kickbacks scheme from 2004 to 2012. Petrobras also announced losses of $1.8 billion for the third quarter of 2014, and posted an asset devaluation of $14.8 billion, largely because of the slide in international oil prices and postponed refinery projects. Releasing the results “is a fundamental step toward fully salvaging the company’s credibility,” said the state-controlled firm’s new chief executive, Aldemir Bendine. He told journalists at Petrobras headquarters in Rio de Janeiro that the company’s “second challenge” was to draft a new business plan for the next five years, which he said would be released within 30 days. Analysts said the company still has work to do to restore the confidence of the market and the country. “This could be an excellent first step, but it doesn’t say much in and of itself,” said Daniel Marques, chief analyst at consulting firm Gradual Investimentos. “Petrobras’s problem isn’t about oil or finance, it’s about trust. The first thing the company needs to do is recover its credibility, because today the market doesn’t believe it.” Petrobras said it had calculated overpayments of three percent on contracts with 27 companies that formed what investigators call a cartel that paid bribes to company directors to win tenders. It also added in bribes funneled through other companies in cases where investigators said their witnesses had told them about other incidents of corruption. Prosecutors are building their case on testimony from suspects who have agreed to cooperate with the investigation in return for lighter sentences. Analysts say the company’s effort to come clean should help it avoid a partial default on its massive debt of nearly $140 billion. Petrobras had twice delayed releasing its third-quarter results, initially due in November, because PwC would not sign off on them without accounting for losses to corruption. The standoff wiped billions off the company’s stock value as the share price plunged to eight reals. But shares have been creeping back in recent weeks, regaining nearly 60 percent, to more than 13 reals. Those accused in the scandal include the treasurer of the ruling PT, Joao Vaccari, who was arrested last week. Thirteen senators, 22 congressmen, two governors and several former cabinet officials are also being investigated.Petrobras graft costs hit $2.1bn RIO DE JANEIRO: Petrobras lost $2.1 billion to the largest corruption scheme in Brazilian history, the state oil giant said, releasing its first audited accounts of a scandal that has enveloped the company and badly wounded the government. Petrobras, the largest comp...See more
  • War-torn and poor, Yemen must be given a chance for salvation
    Yemen has been under the spotlight in the Arab region and the rest of the world for four weeks. Everyone has been talking about it with the beginning of the operation “decisive storm”. However, we do not know much about the old and ongoing tragedy of the Yemeni people that has been burdening Yemen for more than half a century. This historically booming country has a deprived population suffering from unprecedented starvation and lack of development, among most countries in the world. The Yemenis are suffering from a silent humanitarian crisis that has been kept off the scenes.

    Yemen’s stability is not the problem as the country has witnessed throughout its history numerous consternations that were limited in the space and time. It hasn’t been a problem even after the emergence of Al Qaeda, American drone warfare that has been ongoing for years now, and the brief wars between government-allied forces and the Houthis. Nevertheless, most of the country is lacking civilization. Poverty long preceded Ali Abdullah Saleh’s rule. Yemen has witnessed decades without development. It is now languishing at the bottom of the world, and ranks among the countries that are the most affected by poverty and ignorance.
    Half of the Yemeni population earns just two dollars per month. It is one of the countries that are suffering from the lack of education, medication and other services. This misery has been haunting Yemenis for nearly five decades; it is a bigger and more dangerous issue than the crisis we are witnessing today. It is important to mention that Yemeni’s chance is unlikely to change with the lingering of the old regime and its heirs.
    The current war might be the only way out of the long Yemeni tunnel, in case the concerned countries in the Gulf and the West, care to provide a project that will save the country and not only save the rule of law. The international community, governments and international funds, have previously held conferences to help the Yemeni people, before and after the “Spring Revolution,” but Saleh’s regime was unsettling all deployed efforts to help the country get out of the long tunnels of ignorance, corruption or mere political interests. Saleh has purposely left Yemen outside the cycle of civilization; his government only managed major cities and left the rest of the country to the rule of the tribes.

    During the 60s, Yemen has witnessed transitions like all other Arab states, the transition from colonialism, as is the case of Southern Yemen in 1968, or transition from an obscure tribal power into the modern state, as is the case of Northern Yemen in 1964.

    Dictator dominance
    Similarly to what happened in other Arab countries, the wave of independence veered towards military dictatorship or extremist ideology. Northern Yemen has witnessed conflicts over power between the different victorious authorities; five presidents have come to power in 15 years, and then, at the end, an unexperienced, uncultured, low-ranked military individual became president and dominated the country for more than 30 years.

    As for Southern Yemen, it has fallen into the clutches of the Communists and extremist Marxists, loyal to the Soviet Union; they took control after the departure of the last British soldier in 1968. Yemenis were divided between two Yemens: South and North. They were ruled by two futile regimes that failed to build a modern state, and after the so-called unity, the country turned into a poor state.

    No sign of hope arose before 2011, before the so-called wind of Arab Spring raged in Sanaa. The Yemenis marked the world as they were the most civilized rebels among all other Arabs. Things were peaceful for a year and a half, until the rebels forced Saleh to resign. Saleh only resigned to gain time and stay in power, but he was then injured in a blast and had to forcibly get out due to internal and external pressure.

    Root cause
    Views shared of Yemen are generally political and not economic. This is normal because the problem in Yemen lies in the governance and resources. Poor governance is the cause behind the poverty, ignorance and frustration of the Yemeni people.

    Saleh is a big problem because he was even successful in corrupting the political transition, which was engineered by the United Nations with a close follow-up by major countries, in addition to the full care of the Gulf Cooperation Council. The political transition has been promising for Yemen. Saleh convinced the military and security forces, over which he presided, and spread the idea of rebellion. He established an alliance with his former enemies the Houthis and helped them control the city of Omran and then the capital Sanaa. He brought the country to a disastrous civil and regional war.

    All that we wish for is that the world deploys all possible efforts to save Yemen from its humanitarian plight through providing relief to all parts of the country, and to develop a large economic rescue project that goes beyond the war and its temporary objectives. Yemen is rich in oil, gas and agriculture and needs to have its chance for salvation.
    War-torn and poor, Yemen must be given a chance for salvation
    Yemen has been under the spotlight in the Arab region and the rest of the world for four weeks. Everyone has been talking about it with the beginning of the operation “decisive storm”. However, we do not know much about the old and...See more
  • Adeolu uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Nigerian Rights Group Calls for ICC Probe of Zulu King Abuja - A Nigerian group called for the International Criminal Court (ICC) on Thursday to investigate Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini for "hate speech" blamed for a wave of violence against immigrants in South Africa. South Africa this week deployed soldiers to try to quell anti-immigrant unrest that has killed at least seven foreigners, after being criticized by China, Zimbabwe and Nigeria for failing to protect their citizens against armed mobs. Zwelithini was accused of sparking the trouble with comments in which he urged South Africans to "pop our head lice." "We must remove ticks and place them outside in the sun. We ask foreign nationals to pack their belongings and be sent back," he told supporters at a stadium in Durban a month ago. Nigeria's Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project in a statement called on the ICC to "investigate allegations of hate speech by the Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini, which has resulted in killing, violence and discrimination against Nigerians and other African citizens." Zwelithini has since defended his speech as having been taken out of context, saying attacks on immigrants are "vile." Nigerians are furious, and the foreign ministry summoned South Africa's high commissioner this week. "Nigeria ... spent a lot of money to fund the anti-apartheid struggle, ensuring that many South African students enjoyed scholarships in Nigerian universities," The Punch newspaper wrote in an editorial on Thursday. "Yet, the relationship between South Africa and Nigeria since the end of apartheid ... has been that of contempt by the former towards the latter." Isolated counter-protests involving a few dozen people have occurred in Nigeria, including one outside the South African embassy in Nigeria on Wednesday. South African firms such as mobile phone giant MTN and supermarket chain Shoprite have significant interests in Africa's biggest economyNigerian Rights Group Calls for ICC Probe of Zulu King Abuja - A Nigerian group called for the International Criminal Court (ICC) on Thursday to investigate Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini for "hate speech" blamed for a wave of violence against immigrants in South Africa. South Africa this ...See more
  • Adeolu joined group
    Technology
    Technology
    Total users: 6
  • shashi posted a forum topic
    Packers and Movers services Pune @ http://list5th.in/packers-and-movers-pune/
    Packers and Movers Pune Transferring associated with automobiles is in fact incredibly easier. Truth be told right now there have also been time p...
  • Jenifer uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    South African shops in Malawi shut amid anti-xenophobia protests This is according to Consumers Association of Malawi (CAMA) boss, John Kapito who said "it will help show South Africans that people depend on one another across the global and the continent." He said the shop owners of Pep, Game and Shoprite have been tipped to close the shops on Friday. “We have ordered them to remain closed for the day because we are avoiding scenes which you and I don’t want to happen. The demos will be characterised by protests against the attacks on foreigners out there.” However government says demos and boycotting South African shops will not in any way help cool down the situation in South Africa. Speaking in an interview Malawi Information Minister, Kondwani Nankhumwa believes dialogue will be of paramount importance for the two governments as well as others in the region to bring an end to the attacks.South African shops in Malawi shut amid anti-xenophobia protests This is according to Consumers Association of Malawi (CAMA) boss, John Kapito who said "it will help show South Africans that people depend on one another across the global and the continent." He said the shop owners of Pep,...See more
  • Jenifer uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Ghanaians unhappy over Parliament’s inability to check executive “For executive oversight, 6.3% of respondents said it is excellent, 26% rated it as very good, 44.8% as average. More than 20% (22.9%) rated Executive Oversight as below average,” the report stated. The research, which was carried out to test the participation of the citizenry in the country’s democratic process in 2014, also revealed that more Ghanaians expect the Legislature to be effective in its work. Launching the findings of the research on Thursday, Director of Research at the NCCE, Gertrude Zakariah Ali said Parliament as an institution must do more to strengthen the country’s democracy. Law making role “With respect to Parliament’s law making role, 8.6% rated it as excellent, 32.7% as very god, 46% as average, and 12.7% as below.” Accountability The report further stated that with respect to ensuring accountability of Public Officials, 31.8% of respondents were very satisfied with Parliaments work, 35.7% were just satisfied, 20.8% were fairly satisfied, and 11.8% were not satisfied. Meanwhile, Majority Leader Alban Bagbin defended Parliaments action saying some provisions in the 1992 constitution restrain the legislature from carrying out its duties effectively. He said “to try to oversee, you need the resources to be able to oversee. Even though we have by Article 103, the power to establish standing committees and other committees, you will need to be able to provide the resource to those committees to inquire, to probe, to investigate the activities of the executive. So if it is the executive that is supposed to release the resources to you to investigate them then I’m sure that those resources will not be forthcoming.” “So if the committees don’t have the resources to move out to do the investigation then they will definitely be seen as ineffective.” He further stated that “if the majority of the ministers are members of parliament and these same members of parliament who are ministers of state, and are by provisions of the constitution are permitted to debate and vote in the house, then you will understand whether the members of parliament, whether majority or minority will always have that free air or conducive environment to do that inquiry. So yes its true that the 25% is good score mark for the performance of Parliament so far as the investigative and oversight responsibility is concerned.”Ghanaians unhappy over Parliament’s inability to check executive “For executive oversight, 6.3% of respondents said it is excellent, 26% rated it as very good, 44.8% as average. More than 20% (22.9%) rated Executive Oversight as below average,” the report stated. The research, which was carried out ...See more
  • Tunisian accused in migrant boat disaster appears in Italian court
    CATANIA, Italy (Reuters) - The presumed captain of a migrant boat that sank off Libya with the loss of more than 700 lives appeared before an Italian judge on Friday after prosecutors asked that he be charged with homicide and people-trafficking.

    Mohammed Alì Malek, 27, has denied that he was in charge of the heavily overloaded fishing boat which capsized shortly before midnight on Saturday with hundreds of African and Bangladeshi migrants locked in its lower decks.

    Prosecutors say survivors have identified him as the boat's captain but his lawyer, Massimo Ferrante, said late on Thursday Malek would tell judges that he was a passenger on the vessel.

    The Tunisian showed little emotion as the preliminary hearing began in a court in the Sicilian city of Catania where he is likely to come face to face with a number of survivors who will be giving testimony.

    A 25-year-old Syrian, Mahmud Bikhit, who prosecutors believe was a crew member, has denied involvement and accused Malek of being in charge of the vessel when it collided with a merchant ship coming to its aid and capsized.

    He may face charges of favouring clandestine immigration but not of multiple homicide.

    Only 28 people survived the disaster, believed to be the heaviest loss of life on the Mediterranean in decades and which underlined the scale of the migrant crisis facing Europe.

    The sea is one of the main routes into the European Union for tens of thousands of mostly Asian and African migrants fleeing war and poverty, with almost 40,000 people having arrived this year already.

    The heavy loss of life has also raised pressure for action by EU countries, who pledged this week to step up search and rescue operations in the southern Mediterranean.
    After interviewing the survivors, prosecutors have concluded that more than 750 people are likely to have been aboard the 20-metre-long fishing boat, but with most locked in the hold and lower deck, only 24 bodies have been recovered.

    They have also requested that Malek face kidnapping charges in addition to multiple counts of homicide, causing a shipwreck and facilitating clandestine immigration.

    Friday's hearing is an "incidente probatorio", a preliminary hearing intended to allow judges to establish the basic facts of a case before a decision is taken on whether to file charges.
    Tunisian accused in migrant boat disaster appears in Italian court
    CATANIA, Italy (Reuters) - The presumed captain of a migrant boat that sank off Libya with the loss of more than 700 lives appeared before an Italian judge on Friday after prosecutors asked that he be charged with homicide and...See more
  • John_dawin posted a forum topic
    There's total chaos on global markets
    There is chaos in global markets as stocks in China are down more than 5%, stocks in Europe are selling off, and now US futures are following lower.In...
  • Why is Greece flirting with the Russians?
    Fear is running amok yet again that the cash-strapped Greek government will default on its loans to its European partners and the International Monetary Fund. While its fate is still unknown, one thing has become clear this week: Greeks are scrambling to find assistance from wherever they can find it—its own government's coffers, and even with overtures to Washington and Moscow.

    A signal of how dire the situation is: The far-left government passed an edict Monday requiring public agencies to turn over idle reserves to the Greek central bank to help plug fiscal gaps. In addition, come Friday, the euro zone's finance ministers are likely to throw a tantrum once again when they meet in Riga, as Greece has yet to come up with a list of acceptable economic reforms.
    In the midst of this financial cobweb, the Greeks are playing proverbial footsie with the Russians. On the heels of a much ballyhooed meeting in Moscow between Russia's President Vladimir Putin and the Greek Prime Minister Alexi Tsipras two weeks ago, the chief executive of Russia's gas giant, Gazprom, Alexei Miller, traveled to Athens on Tuesday to discuss, as the Greek energy minister's office put it, matters of "energy cooperation."

    At the same time, Greece's Foreign Minister Nikos Kotzias traveled to Washington to meet with Secretary of State John Kerry on Monday, a meeting that both sides characterized as friendly. A coincidence? Maybe. But it's hardly unlikely that the meeting was pure happenstance.

    Thanks to press reports in Greece and Germany, rumors are abuzz that Russia is going to extend a helping hand to Greece by offering up a $5-billion-dollar advance payment of a pipeline project, called the Turkish Stream, that would carry Russian gas from the Black Sea to Europe via Greece, Turkey, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Serbia and Hungary.

    Foreign Minister Kotzias told CNBC that the pipeline came up in his meeting with Secretary Kerry—and explained that he assured the secretary that the issue was an economic one and not a political one. "We had a friendly discussion to find solutions to many problems," he said. He declined to elaborate on details.

    Russia's Trojan Horse

    The presumed Russian cash advance, of course, would give Greece a much-needed cash infusion. If only a handout were that easy—and news of it were true. The Russians have denied that any deal has been reached—and even the Greek energy minister would not comment on the subject of advance payments when asked to do so by the Greek press. No details about the pipeline deal have been forthcoming. As of yet, nothing has been signed.

    "In practical matters, Tsipras achieved almost nothing with his visit to Moscow," said George Tzogopoulos, Greek expert and author of books including "The Greek Crisis in the Media."

    Read MoreCan Greece's rebel leader rescue the nation from default?

    Yet the rounds of meetings, and particularly their timing, have fanned the flames of a controversy that has hung like a cloud over the new Greek government's handling of its financial crisis so far: Is the Syriza-led government trying to play the Russia card to ease the pressure from its European creditors? Why is Greece flirting with Russia, anyway—and what could it mean for its relations with Europe, NATO and even the United States?

    In an exclusive phone interview with CNBC after his meeting with Secretary Kerry, Greek Foreign Minister Kotzias dismissed the idea that Greece was doing anything wrong by pursuing diplomatic relations with Russia.

    "I have to wonder why, when other countries go to Russia, no one mentions it. But when Greece goes, we're the devil," he said in a phone conversation.

    "We have normal diplomatic relations like everybody else," he added. "Why is everybody pointing fingers at us? We are just doing what is normal. I do not like these two standards."

    Indeed, he has a point. Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi visited the Kremlin in March. Even Angela Merkel admitted as much when asked about Tsipras' visit to Moscow earlier this month. "We were also in Moscow, and we're still members of the European Union and stand unified," she told reporters.

    Greek-Russian trade ties

    Nonetheless, as talk of a pipeline deal with the Russians swirls about, the string of events this week makes it hard not to question what is happening behind the scenes. Is Russia possibly taking advantage of its historically friendly relations with Greece—and Greece's tough financial situation—to create a lever of support against Europe's Russian sanctions? The sanctions are set to expire in July, around the same time that another round of Greek loan payments are due. The timing has probably not been lost on anyone involved.

    "Putin is certainly trying to cultivate the impression that Greece is one of the countries that might be friendly to the Russians," said political science professor Alexander Cooley of Barnard College.

    Tsipras is playing up his Russian ties, too, especially to his constituents, who voted him in on campaign pledges that he would stand up to the European austerity measures. Many analysts argue that Tsipras visited the Kremlin for domestic consumption to demonstrate that Greece does not have to rely only on its European partners. "By showing that the government has other options, Tsipras is playing to his base," said professor Cooley.

    The leftist prime minister's perceived tilt toward Russia is not that surprising. For starters, Tsipras and many in his far-left party have roots in the Greek communist party, the KKE, which has traditionally strong ties with the Kremlin. Secondly, Russia is Greece's largest trading partner.
    But some analysts think it's a doomed strategy. "It is the wrong time for the Greek government to believe, with all the problems that it has, that it could be a catalyst in the formation of a new EU-Russia relationship," said Nikos Meletis, diplomatic correspondent for Ethnos, an Athenian newspaper. "The government has miscalculated and overestimated its role at a moment when everyone sees Greece, because it has run out of money, as a kind of Trojan horse for Putin."

    The reality is that the Russians can't help the Greeks in the short term, anyway, even if they wanted too. Russia has its own economic troubles. The desire to help financially may not be there, either—when Cyprus approached Russia for help in 2013 during its own banking crisis, for example, Russia did not come forward with any assistance.
    The only bright spot, according to analyst Tzogopoulos: Tsipras' Kremlin visit provided encouragement to Russian companies to participate in privatization bids for Greek assets down the road.

    Even Foreign Minister Kotzias in his comments to CNBC acknowledged that the Russians weren't going to solve Greece's severe short-term financial troubles. The talks with Gazprom, he argued, and the possibility of the company sharing its profits with Greece down the road are only part of a solution to Greece's long-term development. "This is not part of a solution to the debt crisis," he said. "Russia cannot give us a solution to our problem."

    That solution, argued Kotzias, lies in the hands of Europe—and he is optimistic that a solution will be found through compromise.

    In essence, then, no matter how much Tsipras and his party leaders would like to play the international geopolitical poker game to their own domestic advantage, indeed even their own political survival, Europe has the stronger hand.

    Even a deal with Russia over a gas pipeline, if indeed it ever gets finalized, ultimately will need the approval of the European Union. Said analyst Tzogopoulos: "The EU has the last word." In the latest chapter of the Greek financial saga, it most certainly appears that way.
    Why is Greece flirting with the Russians?
    Fear is running amok yet again that the cash-strapped Greek government will default on its loans to its European partners and the International Monetary Fund. While its fate is still unknown, one thing has become clear this week: Greeks are scrambling...See more
  • John_dawin uploaded 1 new photo to Newsfeed Photos album
    Wiretap scandal threatens democracy in Macedonia Fourteen years since NATO pulled Macedonia from the brink of civil war, the ex-Yugoslav republic once hailed as a success-story of Western intervention is embroiled in a scandal that critics say has exposed its democracy as hollow, and could potentially reopen a dangerous ethnic divide. Macedonian magazine editor Mladen Cadikovski received his "file" in a binder -- page after page of transcribed telephone calls with colleagues and friends, leaked to him by the country's opposition leader who is publishing scores of such wiretaps. Cadikovski's Focus magazine is fiercely critical of Macedonia's conservative government and he was not surprised that authorities might be tapping his calls. "(But) it's a different feeling when you open the folder and see at least a dozen real conversations, that your life is sitting wide open in the palm of someone's hand," he said. For three months, opposition Social Democrat leader Zoran Zaev has been publishing the wiretaps he says he received from a whistleblower. He says they were gathered illegally and on an industrial scale by Prime Minister Nikola Gruevski's government. Voices purported to be those of Gruevski, senior officials, journalists and judges have been aired at press conferences. The tapes appear to expose ministers and security officials discussing how to employ rank-and-file party members in state jobs, pick judges and massage elections. Gruevski has dismissed the wir-taps as the work of foreign spies, and the authorities have charged Zaev, who has no immunity from prosecution, with trying to topple the government. The European Union, which Macedonia hopes to join, expressed "grave concern" on Tuesday over what it said was deterioration in the rule of law, fundamental rights and freedom of media. "If the recordings are true, and much suggests that they are, Macedonia cannot be described as a democracy," said Florian Bieber, an expert on the region based at the University of Graz. EU envoys to Macedonia have recently blamed the Gruevski government for leading the country towards catastrophe. >> Read: EU envoys warn that Macedonia ‘can explode’ The EU ambassador to Macedonia Erwan Fouéré recently said that the revelation of a vast wiretapping operation providing evidence of corruption by a government that seems to ignore due process and operates by its own rules. >> Read: Waiting for EU leadership: The worsening crisis in Macedonia Gruevski was not available to speak to Reuters, but a senior ally, deputy parliament speaker and former foreign minister Antonio Milososki, accused Zaev of "playing a risky game". "It does not fit someone who is trying to promote himself to be a prime minister of a country, to play the role of Julian Assange or Edward Snowden," he told Reuters, referring to well-known leakers of classified information in the West. Ethnic tensions Faced with the prospect of a lengthy jail sentence, Zaev has now threatened to publish tapes he says expose government machinations against Macedonia's ethnic Albanian minority if Gruevski does not agree to hold new, fair elections. With Macedonia's EU and NATO aspirations in limbo due to a long-running row with Greece, the West's leverage in brokering a solution to the crisis is limited. But the stakes are high. In 2001, amid clashes between government security forces and ethnic Albanian guerrillas, NATO-brokered a peace deal that offered greater rights for the 30 percent Albanian minority and Macedonia was promised a path to membership of NATO and the EU. But progress has been blocked by the dispute with Greece over Macedonia's name, which it shares with a northern Greek province. Meanwhile, Gruevski has shifted right, burnishing Macedonians' sense of national identity with a gaudy, neo-classical facelift of the capital and, critics say, backsliding on democratic freedoms, particularly independent media. Frustration over the lack of progress towards the European mainstream is again fueling ethnic tensions. Diplomats fear both sides in the surveillance scandal may try to exploit the threat of inter-ethnic violence. Zaev says he has wiretaps concerning a notorious murder case from 2012, when five Macedonian men were shot dead at a lake near Skopje. Police blamed "radical Islamists" and five ethnic Albanians were convicted. The case triggered Albanian protests, and some remain suspicious about the official version. "Everyone will know the truth," Zaev told Reuters. Bieber said a bigger risk lay in Gruevski's VMRO-DPMNE trying to stir up ethnic tensions in order to shore up its own support base and distract attention from the wiretaps. On Tuesday (21 April), police said 40 armed men speaking Albanian had briefly seized a police post near Macedonia's northern border with Kosovo, in what authorities described as a "terrorist act". The men disappeared without a trace.Wiretap scandal threatens democracy in Macedonia Fourteen years since NATO pulled Macedonia from the brink of civil war, the ex-Yugoslav republic once hailed as a success-story of Western intervention is embroiled in a scandal that critics say has exposed its democracy as hollow, and could potential...See more
  • shashi posted a forum topic
    Packers and Movers services Mumbai @ http://list5th.in/packers-and-movers-mumbai/
    Packers and Movers Mumbai For virtually any too little quite a few area Movers well prepared, mobile phone most of these model's continually conti...
  • Australian Islamic college bans girls from running fearing they will lose 'virginity'
    Melbourne: An Islamic college has banned its girl students from participating in running competitions as its principal believes it may cause them to "lose their virginity", prompting an investigation by an Australian regulatory body.
    According to 'The Age', the issue of banning the girls from running by the Al-Taqwa College in Truganina suburb was being probed by the state schools regulator Victorian Registration and Qualifications Authority (VRQA).
    The report quoted a letter sent to the education ministers this week by a former teacher which claimed that female students were being discriminated against at the school.
    "The principal holds beliefs that if females run excessively, they may 'lose their virginity'," the letter said adding "The principal believes that there is scientific evidence to indicate that if girls injure themselves, such as break their leg while playing soccer, it could render them infertile".
    The principal of the college, Omar Hallak, has been accused of stopping girls from competing in sporting events believing potential injuries could also make them infertile.
    Hallak had earlier also claimed that Israel and the US had conspired to create the Islamic State terrorist group, The Age reported.
    The school is located in Melbourne's outer-west takes male and female students from Prep to Year 12, and also has campuses at Tarneit and in Indonesia.
    The issue has been referred to both federal and state education ministers.
    Victorian Education Minister James Merlino said he was not aware of receiving the letter, but has referred the claim to VRQA to investigate.
    "If these claims are true they would be very concerning," Merlino said.
    "There are minimum standards that school's must meet, including minimum standards of governance. I've asked the VRQA to investigate to determine whether these reports are true and if they are, to report back to me and what further action could be taken," he said.
    Australian Islamic college bans girls from running fearing they will lose 'virginity'
    Melbourne: An Islamic college has banned its girl students from participating in running competitions as its principal believes it may cause them to "lose their virginity", prompting an investigation by an A...See more
To view the requested page:
(i) Login or register.
(ii) User needs to add you or accept your friend request.